The Chevy Silverado’s Cylinder Switch Saves Fuel Without Sacrificing the Power of a V8

Hey Dallas Ft Worth Chevrolet owners, did you know that more than half of all full-size Chevy pickups sold 20 years ago are still on the road today? I’m not surprised seeing how the Silverado has a reputation of being the most dependable, longest lasting full-size pickup in the world. Not to mention, it’s V-8 engine has a track record that is practically untouchable.

In a GM press release, GM said that more than 85 percent of Silverado customers use their pickups to tow or haul and that these customers expect their trucks to be economical and they expect them to last. Until now, the only real draw back to driving a full-size pickup has been the fuel economy.This is no longer the case as GM engineers are improving the fuel efficiency of its mainstream 5.3-liter V-8 engine by switching off four of the cylinders when they aren’t needed.

Jordan Lee, Chevrolet’s global chief engineer for small block engines, said “Rather than adding turbochargers or multi-valve cylinder heads to increase the power of smaller engines, we chose to keep the proven capability of our larger V-8 truck engines, and save fuel by switching off half of the cylinders when they aren’t needed.”

By giving customers V-8 power and capability when they need it, with enhanced fuel efficiency when they don’t, Silverado offers the best EPA fuel economy estimates of any V-8 pickup, said Lee. “In fact, our 5.3-liter V-8 delivers EPA fuel economy estimates comparable to some competitors’ V6 engines.”

So all-in-all, what does this mean for future Silverado drivers in Grapevine and the rest of the DFW metroplex? It means better fuel economy without sacrificing the power of that famous Chevrolet V-8. Sound pretty good to me… what do you guys think? Check out this video from Chevrolet below.


[Source: media.GM.com]

Thanks to Cassidy Schafer for contributing.

Get Better Fuel Economy in Your Chevrolet Car or Truck

Hey Dallas Ft Worth I’m sure you hear people talk about fuel-saving tips all the time, but have you ever actually tried any of them? You’d be surprised at how much you can really save by doing the smallest of things.

The list of these things goes on and on, with some tips actually being myths. It all depends on the credibility of the source. Recently, ConsumerReports.org provided some tips that I had to share.

Choices. If you have a smart phone, there is an array of applications you can download that will tell you the prices of nearby gas stations. One of the best ones by far is GasBuddy. It’s free and easy. When it’s time for a fill-up, there’s no reason in the world you shouldn’t spare the single minute it takes to find your options.

Pass on premium gas. If your car is designed to run on regular gasoline, as most vehicles are, don’t waste your money on premium unless it’s “required”. It won’t make your engine run any better, and the only real difference you’re likely to see is about 20 cents more per gallon. To find out if your car needs top-grade gas, check the owner’s manual, or fuel-filler door. If premium is “recommended,” then it is optional. Peak, at-the-limit performance may decrease, but it is not likely to be noticeable to the typical driver.

Reduce drag. Don’t add to your car’s aerodynamic drag by carrying things on top of the roof or hanging off the back of your vehicle if you don’t have to. When ConsumerReports installed a large car-top carrier on a Toyota Camry, gas mileage dropped by a notable 6 mpg when we drove at 65 mph. Ski season is over; take off the unused rack. And even though kayak season is in full swing, remove the carrier when not in use.

Tire inflation. This one has been said time and time again and in ConsumerReports’ tests, they found that fuel economy is reduced when tires are not inflated to where they should be. Check your tires’ pressure and top off as needed when they’re cold (before the vehicle has been driven or after no more than a couple of miles of driving). Use the inflation pressure recommended by the vehicle’s manufacturer, not the maximum pressure embossed on the tire’s sidewall. The recommended pressure is usually found on a placard on a front doorjamb, in the glove compartment, or in the owner’s manual.

Check your route. With GPS systems, it is now even easier to track traffic and choose alternative routes, but keep in mind that traveling at a consistent speed without many stops or traffic lights is best for fuel economy. Some GPS devices, including recent Garmins, have an “Eco” function to factor fuel consumption into its route plans.

The next time you fill up, give these tips a try and see if they actually make a difference in your new Chevrolet car or trucks gas mileage. I’m willing to wager that you’ll see a difference.

Thanks to Cassidy Schafer for contributing.